Thursday, July 30, 2009

Local Love Fridays: Our Family Farm

Here is a puzzle:



What are these two objects, and what do they have to do with baking?

To find out, Local Love Fridays is over here at my writing gig today. Please come by and say hello.


11 comments:

Brian Miller said...

nice...just pull us along...hehe...

Luisa Perkins said...

Love it! Still working on getting on that site.

Los Angelista said...

Wow, duck eggs are huge! So you can still make an omelet with those?

Jen of A2eatwrite said...

Yup Brian - I'm shameless that way. ;-)

Luisa... are you having problems or just a time crunch? There have been some site bugs.

Los A - yes, they are, but you can, indeed, make an omelet with them. I think it might even be fluffier because of the properties of the egg whites.

Oh said...

perfect picture. tasty treat! really, you could frame this photo and hang on your kitchen wall.

Diane, Fit to the Finish said...

I didn't know the right answer until I read some of the other comments! That egg is huge!

A few years ago on "Amazing Race" the contestants had to cook and eat an entire ostrich egg! That thing was enormous!

burpandslurp said...

I've had duck eggs before, in the form of salted and century eggs. Not liking the salted too much, but the century eggs are AWESOME> Have you ever tried those? Not for baking though, lol!

Jen of A2eatwrite said...

Oh - thanks for the kind words - I had to monkey with the lighting a bit, as they were very shadowy at first.

Diane - I don't know if you're local, but Ernst Farm sells ostrich eggs. They are, indeed, huge. Never tried those. Thanks so much for stopping by!

Burp - I haven't tried either. What are Century Eggs? Are they similar to 1000-year-old Eggs?

Mae Travels said...

I liked Lydia's Perfect Pantry recipe for Asian slaw -- I think her dressing would work on your vegetables. URL is
http://www.theperfectpantry.com/2009/05/sriracha-recipe-asian-broccoli-slaw.html

I tried it twice with varying veggies, except I didn't use agave nectar, I used maple syrup.

d i a n a m u s e said...

Brilliant! Just yesterday we (my kids and I) were at a neighborhood market and we spied a basketful of duck eggs at the butcher counter. After a brief review of the incubation process and assurances that these eggs had no chance of producing live ducklings, we moved on to the next item on our list. I silently determined to figure out how/if I might use duck eggs in cooking. And presto! Your post is my answer! After reading your fine article, I feel confident that I could give a duck egg omelet or duck egg custard the old college try.

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